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Dubrovnik
Fortress

Dubrovnik, once one of the most important European trade centres, is today a main tourist centre. Its Old City was added to the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. The history of Dubrovnik is long and interesting – for a time the city was under the protectorate of the Byzantine empire, it also survived Arab siege, was also the seat of a bishop and an archbishop, the estate of the Venetian Republic, and a separate state called the Republic of Ragusa (Ragusa being the official name of the city before 1918), later abolished by the Napoleonic authorities. After that, these lands belonged to Italy, France and Austria, and were a part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Only after its fall in 1941, there was created the Independent State of Croatia.

Such cities are always challenging – you need a lot of effort to find a way to talk about it once again.

This project was a challenge for us for several reasons. First of all – we recorded the whole material with a phone, LG G5, using its two lenses and the Cam Plus mode. Secondly, when walking through the streets of old Dubrovnik, we felt like in a good strategy game and decided to capture this atmosphere. That was a starting point for the navigation in our multimedia story. And thirdly – combining these two elements, the film material and the idea into one.
With great happiness and a little bit of anxiety, we give to you the Fortress Dubrovnik.

List of localisations
Pile Gate

Pile Gate

This is the main entrance to the old fortified part of the city. We access it by a stone bridge, which dates back to 1537 and crosses the moat covered with greenery. In the niche above the entrance stands a small statue of St. Blaze, the patron saint of Dubrovnik. In the fortifications between the inner and outer wall there is a Gothic portal from 1460.

The Gate of Ploče

The Gate of Ploče

The fourteenth-century gate is located next to the Dominican monastery and leads to the harbour. Goods from all Mediterranean ports were transported and delivered to and from this place. It is reached by a heavy stone bridge. In front of it stands the tower of Asimov. The moat separates the gate and the fortress Revelin.

The Gate of Buža

The Gate of Buža

There are five gates to the city. Interestingly, only one was given a demeaning name “buža”, that is “hole”. On the other side of the gate there is just a simple arched passage, devoid of ornaments and other elements, which is the reason for this association.

St. John Fortress

St. John Fortress

There was a time when a chain was stretched from the fortress to the nearby island, and from there to the tower of St. Luke, in order to defend the port. Today, the fortress is the home to the Maritime Museum presenting marine history of Dubrovnik, and to the Aquarium with wonderful specimens of fauna of the Mediterranean, including seahorses.

Fort Bokar

Fort Bokar

Minčeta Tower

Minčeta Tower

The medieval tower is the most northern part of the fortifications of Dubrovnik. It was designed by Michelozzo Michelozzi in 1461 and completed three years later. It is the most visited defensive structure in Dubrovnik. Monumental semicircular tower is crowned by a second, smaller, with gun ports at the top.

Lovrijenac Fortress

Lovrijenac Fortress

A fortress in fortifications of Dubrovnik, located outside the City Walls, on a rocky peninsula Lovrijenac between the bays Uvala Kolorina and Uvala Pile. It is often called “Dubrovnik’s Gibraltar”. The massive stone structure, once so difficult to conquer, is now eagerly visited by the crowds of tourists. This is one of the most impressive places in Dubrovnik and even became a symbol of the city. The fortress was built on a huge, 37-metre rock with phenomenal views of the sea. The first and most important function of the fortress was to defend the western part of the city against attack from both land and sea.

Revelin Fortress

Revelin Fortress

It was designed in 1538. This is the last of the defensive structures built here. It has massive quadrilateral walls, enclosing three large rooms and a terrace. In moments of danger treasures and works of art were brought here. It was built and designed by the Spanish architect Antonio Ferramolino. The fortress has magnificent interior, which served as a city hall and the state treasury. The fortress is fronted with a square-shaped terrace facing the sea, with an open view on the harbour.

City Walls

City Walls

City Walls are a symbol of the city and offer a magnificent view of the surrounding countryside. They were built in the tenth century and extended in the thirteenth century. The walls and ramparts are impressive – they are 1940 metres long, and in some places reach up to 25 metres in height. From the land side they are reinforced with a wall with 10 semi-circular bastions. From the Adriatic the city and harbour were defended from towers and fortress of St. John. This defensive system was strengthened by the fortresses Revelin from the east and Lovrijenac from the west.

Big Onofrio's Fountain

Big Onofrio's Fountain

A favourite meeting place for locals and visitors of Dubrovnik.  A sixteen-sided well is one of the most characteristic monuments of the city. It is located on the square just next to the Pile Gate. It was created in the years 1438-1444 according to the plans of the architect Onofrio della Cava, who designed the water supply system for the city. The well used to have two storeys, but the upper part was destroyed during an earthquake in 1667.

Small Onofrio's Fountain

Small Onofrio's Fountain

The fountain in the centre of Dubrovnik, was designed by Neapolitan builder Onofrio della Cava in 1438 as a part of the Dubrovnik water supply system. The plan also included rising its bigger sibling. It is located on the eastern edge of the Stradun, next to the building of the Main Guard. The fountain supplied the nearby marketplace on Luza Square with water. Ornaments were made by sculptor Petar Martinov. In the Middle Ages the fountain was of religious significance, as it was used only by Christians. Right next to it was also a Jewish fountain which was used by Dubrovnik Jews.

Orlando Column

Orlando Column

A medieval column presenting the knight Orlando, also known as Roland, made famous by the French chivalry epic poem “The Song of Roland”, stands on the Luža square in Dubrovnik. In the Middle Ages statues of Roland were erected in many European cities, the so called Roland cities, as a sign of freedom. The statue of Orlando symbolised the independence of the city, its right to free trade and own legislature. The column was built in 1419 on the initiative of Sigismund, the son of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV. Orlando’s Column was to symbolize the independence of Dubrovnik from the Venetian Republic.

The Old Port

The Old Port

Beautiful, located next to the city walls. It is a haven to numerous boats and sailing boats.

Gundulic Square

Gundulic Square

It is located at the end of the Puca street. It was created as a result of the great earthquake of 1667, as the houses that stood in this place collapsed. Today on the square stands the statue of the poet Ivan Gundulić, created by the sculptor Rendić. In 1893, on the square there was put a small fountain, donated by a benefactor, Mr. Amerling.

Lazareti

Lazareti

Rector's Palace

Rector's Palace

For centuries it was the seat of the most important government institutions. Here met members of the government, and each rector, presiding over them, lived there for a month of his term. The building was erected in the early fifteenth century on the place of a medieval fortress. In the halls of the palace now houses the Dubrovnik Museum, dedicated to the history of the city.

Sponza Palace

Sponza Palace

It is located on the left side of the Loggia square. It was built in the sixteenth century. It then housed a mint, and is now a house to the State Archives. Over the entrance is written the inscription: “Our weights do not permit cheating or being cheated. When I measure the commodities the Lord measures with me” It has beautiful Gothic windows.

Loggia of the Bell

Loggia of the Bell

Loggia of the Bell and its four bells date back to 1463. The bells were used to alarm citizens when the city was in danger. Luža Bells warned residents of the incoming danger. There were also a signal summoning the Great Council. On this tower is located a clock and the “golden ball”. They showed time and phases of the moon. Inside the tower two miners made of bronze, hit the bell every hour. The bells are called by locals “zelenci.”

Stradun street

Stradun street

A wide street crossing the city from east to west, called Stradun or Placa. It was set in the twelfth century after filling up the channel separating the island from the mainland. The street was paved in 1468, and after the earthquake in 1667 a number of stone buildings were built on it. Today, thanks to its lively cafés and bars, it is a great place to spend time, especially in the evenings.

Holy Savior Church

Holy Savior Church

On the left of the Pile Gate entrance there is a small Renaissance Holy Savior Church. It was founded in 1528, out of gratitude for saving the city from the earthquake in 1520. The church itself survived the great earthquake of 1667. Its beautiful façade is worth paying attention to. The church was the first building at Stradun.

Franciscan Monastery

Franciscan Monastery

The monastery was in construction for a long time – it began in 1317, and was completed in the next century. After the earthquake in 1667 it was rebuilt in the Baroque style. In the chapter house there is a Franciscan Museum housing works of sacral art and instruments from a pharmaceutical laboratory. The monastery also holds a library with a valuable collection of books.

St. Blaise Church

St. Blaise Church

It was built on the site of an older Romanesque church from the fourteenth century. It was destroyed and rebuilt several times due to: an earthquake (1667), a fire (1706) and another earthquake (1979). It was damaged during military operations of the Civil War (1991-1992). It preserved many Baroque works. In the main altar stands a fifteenth-century, silver, gold-plated statue of St. Blaise depicting the saint with a model of the medieval town in his hand.

Cathedral of the Assumption of the Virgin

Cathedral of the Assumption of the Virgin

It was built by Roman architects after the earthquake in 1667 on a place of a Romanesque church. It represents the Baroque style. It was founded on a site of a temple, which, according to a legend, was built by the English King Richard the Lionheart in gratitude for the miraculous saving of his ship, which crashed into the nearby island Lokrum while returning from his crusade. The interior of the cathedral contains many valuable paintings, including an original painting by Titian, beautiful altars and a rich treasury.

St. Sebastian's Church

St. Sebastian's Church

St. Sebastian’s Church was founded in 1466. Although it was built in the Gothic style, it is decorated also with the Romanesque semicircular apse. The church stands near the gates to the city – its purpose was to defend it against plagues trying to break through the walls, which was common in Europe at that time.

Rozario Church

Rozario Church

Next to the Dominican Monastery there is a building that once was part of the complex. It is the Rozario Church. Currently it is used as a gallery. The building dates back to 1594 and is built in the Mannerist and Baroque style.

Dominican Monastery

Dominican Monastery

It plays a very important role in the cultural life of the city. It was founded in 1315. The greatest architects and sculptors were hired to design and erect it. However, after the earthquake in 1667 it was necessary to rebuild it. The church is reached by a long staircase with a stone balustrade. Monastery rooms are located around Gothic cloister galleries. Inside of it is now housed the Dominican Museum.

Convent of St. Claire

Convent of St. Claire

Just south of the Great Fountain of Onofrio is located a former convent of St. Claire. It was erected at the turn of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. In 1434 one of the world’s first orphanages was opened in a wing of the convent. When, in 1806 Napoleon’s army entered Dubrovnik, the convent was dissolved, and in its premises used for armoury, and later stables. Currently, there is a restaurant inside, and one of the most popular among tourists… toilets (paid).

Sigurata Church

Sigurata Church

Hidden behind the Franciscan Monastery. The first church on this place was erected in the sixth century. It was expanded in the Baroque style in the seventeenth century. Today it houses a female Franciscan monastery and a museum with a liturgical exhibition. It can be visited only after having earlier booked. Too bad, as it is one of the oldest buildings in Dubrovnik, dating back to the eleventh century.

Church of St. Luke

Church of St. Luke

The Church of the Annunciation is directly adjoined by a much smaller and less stately church. This Gothic building was built in the fifteenth century on a place of the former chapel from the tenth century. Last renovation here took place in 1787. The building is topped with a single bell tower, and its double doors are adorned with decoratively carved ogival archivolts. Just behind the church there is one of the three entrances to the Walls.

St. Dominic's Church

St. Dominic's Church

It was built in 1452 as a three-nave church with a rectangular apse and destroyed in the great earthquake in 1667. In the same century it was rebuilt in Baroque style. Inside there is a seventeenth-century altar dedicated to the glory of all the saints. Next to the church there is a House of Marin Držić – a museum dedicated to the life and work of this renowned playwright from Dubrovnik.

St. Ignatius Church

St. Ignatius Church

Jesuit church built as a Baroque one-nave building of the stately façade, modelled on the church of St. Ignatius in Rome. Its construction was completed in 1725. The temple is located on the square called Poljana of Roger Joseph Boscovich. The square is accessed by the monumental staircase dating back to 1738 and modelled on the Spanish Steps. Inside there are Baroque illusionist frescoes with scenes from the life of St. Ignatius of Loyola.