Jewish Cemetery in Białystok

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Jewish Cemetery in Białystok

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There are several Jewish cemeteries in Białystok which shows the presence of Jews over a few centuries. The one you see here is located on ul. Wschodnia. It’s in the north part of the, close to orthodox and catholic cemeteries. It was established in 1892, but burials already took place 2 years earlier.

It’s one of the biggest Jewish cemeteries in Poland and the only one preserved in its entirety in Białystok. It was the property of Jewish community in Białystok until 1943. National Treasury took it in 1966 and closed it seven years later. The last burial took place in 1969.

There’s about 6000 graves here and they cover the area of 12.5 ha. The oldest one is from 1876. Graves are made mainly from marble, limestone, sandstone and granite. The inscriptions are written in several languages – Polish, Hebrew, Yiddish, German and Russian. The graves all look different – some are richly decorated, others more modest, some very simple. There’s a statue that stands out, dedicated to the Jews killed by Russians in a massacre in 1906. Almost a hundred Jews were killed then.

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There are several Jewish cemeteries in Białystok which shows the presence of Jews over a few centuries. The one you see here is located on ul. Wschodnia. It’s in the north part of the, close to orthodox and catholic cemeteries. It was established in 1892, but burials already took place 2 years earlier.

It’s one of the biggest Jewish cemeteries in Poland and the only one preserved in its entirety in Białystok. It was the property of Jewish community in Białystok until 1943. National Treasury took it in 1966 and closed it seven years later. The last burial took place in 1969.

There’s about 6000 graves here and they cover the area of 12.5 ha. The oldest one is from 1876. Graves are made mainly from marble, limestone, sandstone and granite. The inscriptions are written in several languages – Polish, Hebrew, Yiddish, German and Russian. The graves all look different – some are richly decorated, others more modest, some very simple. There’s a statue that stands out, dedicated to the Jews killed by Russians in a massacre in 1906. Almost a hundred Jews were killed then.

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